Periods and Commas

Period Comma

Change is a constant (or at least should be) for those in positions of leadership. It can be hard and exciting, draining and energizing, scary and exciting, all at the same time. Which of these emotions your staff focuses on will be determined, at least in part, by whether you as the leader approach change with a period or with a comma.

Periods are about ending . . . a thought, a program, something people have invested in and valued. A “period approach” to change often makes the process harder for people, and slows the entire process, because the focus is stopping — and who wants to stop something that was important to them? Even if it seems obvious to you that the ending is inevitable and you think “everyone” knows it needs to happen, trying to end it with a period on it will make the process harder.

Commas, on the other hand, connect what came before and what will come after. They provide a pause but also link two separate but related thoughts. Commas aren’t about ending, they are about continuing — perhaps in a different direction, but carrying on nonetheless. Continuing is easier. It keeps what came before the comma attached to the new direction, which signifies its value and worth.

How do you approach change with a comma rather than a period? Acknowledge the importance of the program/approach/product in bringing your organization to the place it is today. (No one wants to think that something they dedicated significant time and effort to was not effective or is no longer relevant.) Clearly articulate how what was done in the past sets the stage for the new opportunity. If your organization has a long history, perhaps point out that the organization could not have survived without the ability to adapt and change in the pursuit of its mission. Let your people know how their efforts have contributed to your organization’s success. Honor past contributions, and let them know the role they will play going forward.

Acknowledging what came before, and articulating how it connects to what comes after, does not automatically make the change process easy. It does, however, chart a path for your team to follow. It provides a balance point for the range of emotions related to the change effort. It sets a destination to keep moving towards rather than consuming unnecessary time and energy in the process of stopping one thing and then starting another.

It might seem like a little thing, but a well-placed comma can make a huge difference. You’re the leader. It’s up to you. How will you punctuate your next change effort?

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